the Going on s of a woodworker

wyckoffwoodworks:

Crucifix, 1930, Macassar Ebony, 
Wharton Esherick

That is my favorite captains bed in the background

wyckoffwoodworks:

Crucifix, 1930, Macassar Ebony, 

Wharton Esherick

That is my favorite captains bed in the background

(Source: facebook.com, via grainwoodwork)

“Contrary to Geppetto, who constructed himself (Pinocchio) to banish his loneliness, Bruno Walpoth attempts, perhaps out of awareness of life’s transience, to immortalize the volatile spark of youthfulness he catches in the eyes of his models – sometimes his own children – into a wooden sculpture,” writes Absolute Art Gallery‘s Diana Gadaldi.  Walpoth’s figures are also reminiscent of the children in the paintings of Dino Valls and Gottfried Helnwein, yet are not so tortured nor forced into adulthood.  They are more ghostly, or perhaps more Buddhist, as if silently accepting of a new maturity.”

http://www.modernism.ro/2012/02/19/ghostly-sculptures-of-bruno-walpoth/

Woah

(Source: littlelimpstiff14u2, via andthatshowitsgonnabe)

cabinporn:

Towering treehouse in the hills north of Santa Cruz, CA.

Submitted & photographed by John Watson.

More at The Radavist.

I stayed in a tree house in Santa Cruz once, way cool

anvilgoods:

Tiny walnut coffee cup and salt bowl and a cherry spoon. Along with 2 new Swissmade chisels for our collection #anvilgoods #woodworking #woodspoons #handmade

I really like these

anvilgoods:

Tiny walnut coffee cup and salt bowl and a cherry spoon. Along with 2 new Swissmade chisels for our collection #anvilgoods #woodworking #woodspoons #handmade

I really like these

giantcypress:

Executive summary of WoodTalk #177.
Go listen. It’s a terrific discussion.
(Picture poached from Adam Maxwell.)

This is pretty good.

giantcypress:

Executive summary of WoodTalk #177.

Go listen. It’s a terrific discussion.

(Picture poached from Adam Maxwell.)

This is pretty good.

giantcypress:

This is a clever way to add a locking mechanism to a Japanese-style toolbox. Clay Gossage was kind enough to send these photos of how he incorporated a wedge with a dovetail profile to lock the lids of boxes that he made in preparation moving his tools in place. Clay also mentioned that he could drive a screw through the wedge into the lid for added security.

More explained bellow

tetsuichi:

Toshio Odate, and his more conventional toolbox design.

With all this 6 board chest talk I have been having this weekend with Christopher Schwarz I really want to make a smaller version for all of my sharpening paraphernalia out of redwood. I’ve watched the Schwarz video 2 times now, still learning things!

tetsuichi:

Toshio Odate, and his more conventional toolbox design.

With all this 6 board chest talk I have been having this weekend with Christopher Schwarz I really want to make a smaller version for all of my sharpening paraphernalia out of redwood. I’ve watched the Schwarz video 2 times now, still learning things!

Headed to Washington, D.C.

So I have visited before and done all of the traditional mall and museum stuffs. I am going with people who have yet to do all that so I will be doing it again with them but I will have 2 days to myself and want to take a day trip or do local woodworking specific things. Antique tool museum, high quality tool store, woodworking school, crafts person house/shop/museum, anything rad from dirt to finished wood I’m interested. You guys have any suggestions?

I am really enjoying this video, I seem to really want to build everything in these videos. It was a great review in hand planing.. For some reason I’ve stopped cross planing keeping it nearer to 90 degrees from at most a 45 across the grain. I have wanted to do another nailed box and after seeing this I really want to build it soon. I would suggest this video. It would be great for both the woodworker with an elaborate shop or the high school student that will put up with using hand tools.