the Going on s of a woodworker

giantcypress:

Executive summary of WoodTalk #177.
Go listen. It’s a terrific discussion.
(Picture poached from Adam Maxwell.)

This is pretty good.

giantcypress:

Executive summary of WoodTalk #177.

Go listen. It’s a terrific discussion.

(Picture poached from Adam Maxwell.)

This is pretty good.

giantcypress:

This is a clever way to add a locking mechanism to a Japanese-style toolbox. Clay Gossage was kind enough to send these photos of how he incorporated a wedge with a dovetail profile to lock the lids of boxes that he made in preparation moving his tools in place. Clay also mentioned that he could drive a screw through the wedge into the lid for added security.

More explained bellow

tetsuichi:

Toshio Odate, and his more conventional toolbox design.

With all this 6 board chest talk I have been having this weekend with Christopher Schwarz I really want to make a smaller version for all of my sharpening paraphernalia out of redwood. I’ve watched the Schwarz video 2 times now, still learning things!

tetsuichi:

Toshio Odate, and his more conventional toolbox design.

With all this 6 board chest talk I have been having this weekend with Christopher Schwarz I really want to make a smaller version for all of my sharpening paraphernalia out of redwood. I’ve watched the Schwarz video 2 times now, still learning things!

Headed to Washington, D.C.

So I have visited before and done all of the traditional mall and museum stuffs. I am going with people who have yet to do all that so I will be doing it again with them but I will have 2 days to myself and want to take a day trip or do local woodworking specific things. Antique tool museum, high quality tool store, woodworking school, crafts person house/shop/museum, anything rad from dirt to finished wood I’m interested. You guys have any suggestions?

I am really enjoying this video, I seem to really want to build everything in these videos. It was a great review in hand planing.. For some reason I’ve stopped cross planing keeping it nearer to 90 degrees from at most a 45 across the grain. I have wanted to do another nailed box and after seeing this I really want to build it soon. I would suggest this video. It would be great for both the woodworker with an elaborate shop or the high school student that will put up with using hand tools.

Just finished Larry’s sharpening video. I enjoyed his approach towards all aspects mentioned. He is a no fuss/no crazy jigs woodworker who sharpens free hand. This is not an intro to sharpening; for that jigs are nice. If you can learn to free hand sharpen these more complicated tasks you won’t need jigs for the easy sharpening anyway.

I feel like I might not get anything done in my botany lecture.. Why did my teacher give this to me before class instead of after?

I feel like I might not get anything done in my botany lecture.. Why did my teacher give this to me before class instead of after?

The woodworking department I work in has the potential to be the best woodworking program in the Nation. It frustrates me when we make decisions that don’t move us towards being the best woodworking program in this hemisphere. I am very frustrated.

lookwhatibuilt:

This is how I make my frames:

The birth of a frame.

1. Find a friend who had to have a tree taken out

2. Split the logs into 8ths with wedges and a sledgehammer

3. Split those pieces into ~2” thick pieces with a homemade froe and mallet

4.Stack all that wood inside for at least a year to dry.

5. Joint two sides with my (new) 45 year old jointer

6. Rip pieces to 1”x1” frame stock and add a 1/2”x1/1” rabbet for glass and artwork and group pieces for size and matching grain

7. Cut end lap joints on the table saw, and clean up with a router and chisel

8. Glue up!

9. Clean it up with a smoothing plane, and add bevel or other shapes for interest and beauty

10. Finish with clear shellac

Now all it needs is glass and art!

I want to do more woodworking like this

(Source: theplaneandthepress)